General Plan

Contents

Introduction
1
Land Use
2
Transportation
3
Economic Development
4
Public Facilities
5
Arts & Recreation
6
Affordable Housing
7
Annexations
8

 

Adopted: May 3, 2012

Special thanks to:
Helper City Planning Commission, Helper City Public Works Department, Helper City Mayor, Dean Armstrong, Helper City Council, Carbon County GIS Department, Southeastern Utah Association of Local Governments (SEUALG) Regional Planner Michael Bryant

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chapter 1: Introduction

1.1 Background. The initial settlement of the Helper area commenced in the early1880’s with the arrival of Teancum Pratt and his plural wives Annie and Sarah. However, only after the arrival of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railway in 1881-82, did Helper begin to develop as a population center. Pratt also mined coal and supplied the residences throughout the fledgling town. By 1887, the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railway had erected some twenty-seven frame residences, with more built later in the year. This was done in anticipation of making Helper a freight terminal upon the changing of the line from narrow to standard gauge, which began in 1889. Here, “helper” locomotives would stand in readiness to aid trains traveling up the steep slope to Soldier Summit, thus the name Helper came to be. The track changeover was completed in 1891, prompting the Salt Lake Tribune to announce that the “new town of Helper” was started in the spring of that year. 1892 the town became the division point for the railroad; Helper was the union station of the eastern and western divisions, the terminals being Ogden, Utah and Grand Junction, Colorado. With this distinction came a new hotel, depot, and other buildings. Helper’s growth proceeded in a slow but deliberate fashion bearing little resemblance to booming metal-mining towns. The first amenities offered to the few settlers and numerous railroad workers included three saloons, one grocery store, and one clothing establishment and a school was built in 1891. By 1895, the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railway buildings and shops in Helper were lighted by electricity, and two reservoirs for water had been constructed. Ethnic diversity was destined to become a chief characteristic of Helper. Industrial expansion, coal mining, and railroading required a great amount of unskilled labor. In 1894 the railroads passenger department established an immigration bureau to advertise Utah Territory. This move coincided with the influx of the numerous immigrants from southern and eastern Europe and from Asia.

Chinese laborers were brought in at an early date to work the Carbon County mines and railroads. As the coal industry began to see substantial growth in the mid to late 1890’s, immigrants from several foreign countries migrated to the area in search of jobs and a better life for their families. The migration of Italians and Austrians (primarily Slovenians, Croatians and Serbians) began to arrive In 1900, Helper’s population was listed at 385 people. Sixteen different nationality groups were represented. “Merchant” and “laborer” comprised most of the occupations for these early immigrants. These provided a unique cultural mix to the coalfields of central-eastern Utah.

1.2 Demographics. Helper City’s population is tied to the mining industry in Carbon County. In recent years the population has been down from previous highs. However the Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget project the population to increase over the next fifty years. Below are charts showing Helper City’s population from the 2000 and 2010 Census. The projected populations are derived from the Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget (GOPB).

Stats

Age Pyramids are included here to illustrate the demographic change of Helper’s residents over time. Each pyramid depicts age categories in five-year increments for each bar on the chart. At the bottom of both charts is the 0 to 4 years age category and at the top is 85 years and older age category. The Helper City 2020 Projected Age Pyramid uses the GOPB estimated population of 2403 off of the chart on page 5. The chart then adds ten years to each age category after which the difference from the 2010 Census population and the 2020 projected population is determined to give a remaining population of 277. That 277 population is then broken down into males and females of ages 0 to 4 and 5 to 9 years old using the same percentage of population from the 2010 Census to finish the chart for the 2020 Projected Age Pyramid.

1.3 Motto. The Helper City Motto is as follows: “The Gateway To Castle Country.”

1.4 Vision Statement. We the citizens of Helper City, valuing our heritage as a mining and railroad center and our unique cultural diversity, will promote the values of historic preservation, beauty, and recreational opportunities, economic diversity, stability and promotion, and community involvement to direct the future growth and development of Helper City.

1.5 Implementation. Implementation of the Helper City General Plan shall come through the working documents of the zoning ordinance, subdivision ordinance, capital facilities plan, City budgets and other ordinances and resolutions as deemed appropriate by the City Council

1.6 Amendments. To maintain the intent and overall integrity of this Plan and to insure that it is a reflection of the needs and desires of the citizens of Helper it shall be the City policy to:
•Have a comprehensive review of the plan every five years
•All zone changes, improvements and ordinance amendments shall be in accordance to this Plan.

The public may request amendments to the General Plan up to __2__ times per calendar year. The City Council may hold a public hearing __2__ times per calendar year to consider the public’s requests. Amendments to the Plan must show that they are in the best interest of the City, promote the general welfare and not diminish the overall quality of life for the citizens of Helper.

Goals

Strategies

Actions

Time
line

Responsible
Parties

Improve or Acquire underdeveloped properties throughout the community

Identify underdeveloped properties within and surrounding the community.
Encourage property improvements on public and private properties.

Cooperation private land owners
Work w/ Carbon County Economic Development Department
Use Brown fields re-development monies
USDA Rural Development monies.

1 to 10 years

Mayor, City Council, Planning Commission,
Historic Preservation Committee

Promote infill of existing subdivisions and the development of new Subdivisions

Encourage subdivision development S.W of Mountain View Cemetery
Make certain that public infrastructure is adequate for development

Engage Property Management and Development entities with possible development  opportunities within the community
Address infrastructure needs in Capital Facilities plan

1 to 10 years

Mayor
City Council
Planning Commission
Private Property Owners & Developers

Develop visual aesthetics plan for sidewalks, lighting and landscaping 

Re-establish Community Council

 

1 to 5 years

Historic Preservation Committee
Mayor
City Council
Planning Commission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapters

Introduction
1
Land Use
2
Transportation
3
Economic Development
4
Public Facilities
5
Arts & Recreation
6
Affordable Housing
7
Annexations
8

 

 

 

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